Caring For Your Eyes and Eyesight

Our vision has a direct impact on our life and the quality of our life. Even if you have 20/20 vision, taking steps to be kind to your eyes can affect your long-term eye health.

Ways to care for your eyes daily:

  • Always get an annual eye exam. Eye problems can creep in over time and you may not even be aware of them until they have reached a more serious stage, such as Glaucoma. A good optometrist can diagnosis and detect early signs of eye problems or eye disease with a simple painless eye exam
  • Use the 10-10-10 rule. If you are doing lots of close-up work such as reading or using a computer screen for hours, take time out to look away and focus on a distant object. This helps give your eyes a break and prevents over straining your eyes
  • Cucumber or tea bags kept in the refrigerator can be used on tired eyes to reduce puffy eyes and help to relax the surrounding muscles of the eyes
  • Drinking plenty of water helps reduce tired and puffy eyes
  • Using good lighting is very important. Good strong light helps improve vision and reduce eyestrain
  • Healthy eating such as incorporating fruits, green leafy veggies, tomatoes, and spinach in your diet
  • Supplementing your diet with vitamins. Adding daily vitamins such as A, C, E, B complex and folic acid, pantothenic acid, biotin and choline which can aid in different ways to keeping your eyes healthy

  • Splashing cold water on the eyes help relax them and reduce puffiness

Reduce Puffy Eyes

Puffy eye is a condition where the area under the eyes are “puffed up”. Eye puffiness is a type of fluid build-up (edema) in the tissues around your eyes. It affects the look of the face and eyes, but is rarely a serious problem. The cosmetic aspect of puffy eyes is important as it gives a tired, sad look to the eyes. The skin around the eyes are thin and delicate and reflect the condition of your mind and body. Eyes with bags under them can also run in the family. Fluid retention in the body such as hormonal problems or allergies, can cause also cause puffy eyes. Usually the causes are stress, lack of sleep, and poor diet.

There are many things you can do to treat and prevent puffy eyes. Avoiding late nights is the first step to take. The quality of sleep is also an issue.

Tips for reducing puffy eyes

  • Splashing your face and eyes with cold water stimulates blood supply through the capillaries and also closes the pores
  • 2 slices of cucumber placed in the refrigerator for 10 minutes, can be placed on the eyes. This helps relax the eyes while dilating blood vessels. 2 tea bags placed in the refrigerator can be used just like the cucumber
  • Massaging your eyes help immensely. With your index and middle fingers gently massage around the eyes in a clockwise and then anti-clockwise motion
  • treatment masks or patches that are placed under the eyes have become popular. There are many kinds such as aloe vera
  • a popular method is using hemorrhoid cream. Be sure not to get it in your eyes

The most essential things to remember when treating puffy eyes is that they reflect your overall health. There are no replacements for good nutrition, plenty of water, or getting just the right amount of sleep.

Human Eye Anatomy

The eye is one of the most complex parts of the body. There are more than a billion parts all working in synchronization. The eyesight is one of the most important senses, a fact supported by the amount of brain that is dedicated to process the information received through the eye.

Anatomy of the eye

Anatomy of the eye

How the eye works

The image begins as light waves bouncing or emanating from an object which enter the eye through the cornea. The cornea is a thin transparent protective shield on the front of the eye. The corneal also functions as a lens and begins focusing the rays of light by bending them (refracting) these as they enter.

These rays then enter the pupil. This is the black hole in the center of the eye, and is a door way which, along with the iris, regulates how much light comes through. Hence the term “dilated pupils”, meaning the pupil is very large letting more light rays through. The iris and pupil are constantly regulating how much light enters the eye.

Once the light rays enter through the pupil they then are focused by the lens. The lens is controlled by a band of muscle called the ciliary muscle. The natural relaxed state of these muscles would be focused at a distance of about 7 feet. In order to focus on objects closer than this the ciliary muscle must push on the lens, shaping it in a more convex shape similar to a bowl. To refocus further the muscles shape the lens to a flatter shape. Accommodation is the process by which the eye changes focus between objects that are far and objects that are near. There is much debate whether the eye focuses by the ciliary muscles acting on the lens, or whether it is the varying elongation of the eyeball caused by the extraocular muscles, or a combination of both.

The action of the lens and the shape of the eyeball then permits the light rays to travel through the rest of the eye. The vitreous humour is the transparent gel between the lens and the retina, the final destination of the light rays.

The retina is a complex light sensitive membrane that lines the inner eyeball. It contains hundreds of millions of light sensitive receptors responsible for transmitting the image to the optic nerve. These receptors are made up of cones and rods. The rods monitor how bright the rays of light are. Cones pick up sharp detail (acuity). There are three types of cones, one for each of the primary light colors. Red receptive cones are stimulated by the amount of red light for example. At the center of the retina is the macula. This has a very high concentration of cones. Within the center of the macula is the fovea. The fovea has the highest concentration if cones.

The optic nerve sends all of this information to the brain, where it is translated into what we see.

Each eye has six extraocular muscles which surround the eye and are responsible for controlling the movement of the eye. These muscles are very powerful, many times stronger than would be required to simply move the eyeball. This strength permits rapid acceleration and precise accuracy in eye movement.