Natural vision improvement

When one mentions “vision correction” there’s a tendency to think there’s something wrong with the eyes. However, the eyes are not the ones actually doing the “seeing”? They are merely apertures through which light rays pass through.

These light rays stimulate the eye and turn the light into brain signals which are sent to the visual cortex (the part of your brain that processes these signals). The brain then decodes those signals and generates the images that you see.

In trying to correct their vision, most people try to fix the eyes themselves. After all, we’ve often been told that because the window is wrong, light rays landed on the wrong part of the eye. Right?

But the truth is, your brain is the one that causes the window to be wrong in the first place. Why? Because it adapts to the environment you’re in. If you’re spending most of your time doing close range work, and you’re always under a lot of stress, then your brain will adapt and send signals to your eyes to make it myopic.

The key to natural vision correction, therefore, is not in correcting the eyes. It’s in correcting the brain. For starters, here’s what you can do:

  • As much as possible, get rid of stress. People who are stressed have higher incidence of eye problems.
  • Try to focus on one task at a time. Studies have shown that multi-tasking decreases productivity and places unnecessary strain on your eyes.
  • Again, use the 10-10-10 rule

Common Eye Disorders

Myopia (nearsighted or short sighted)

This is one of the most common vision disorders. It is the inability to focus on objects at a distance. The light rays are focused at a point in front of the retina, causing a blurring of the image. Myopia is typically caused by continued up close activity which causes the muscles to be in a state of constant contraction causing a lengthening of the eyeball. A person with myopia can see things up close, but they will not be as clear as they would be if the eyes were relaxed as in normal eyesight.

Hyperopia or hypermetropia (long sighted or far sighted)

This is the inability to fucus on objects at a close range. This is caused by tension that sortens the length of the eyeball, therefore becoming to short so that light rays are focused on an area behind the retina.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is an unevenly shaped cornea, almost like a corrugated iron roof. It can be as a result of uneven tension of the extraocular muscles surrounding the eye. This uneven shape causes light rays to focus unevenly, some in front of and some behind the retina.

Presbyopia

This is commonly referred to as “aging vision”. This is the name given to the hardening of the lens and a tightening of the muscles often associated with aging. This condition occurs in nearly everyone at some point in their life, usually around the age of 40. This inflexibility causes ciliary muscle to be unable to change the shape of the lens.