Eye foods

You are what you eat – and this has an impact on your vision, especially in future years. By regularly eating the following foods, researchers have found that vision-related diseases such as cataracts, glaucoma, and macular degeneration (a leading cause of blindness) could be prevented. In some cases, vision can actually be enhanced, particularly night vision. These foods are rich in some super compounds that benefit eye health.

Top Vision Foods

  • Blueberries – one of the best antioxidants (compounds that deter cell damage) which strengthen capillaries for healthier eyes and veins
  • Bilberry – related to blueberries, the bilberry is an herb that also strengthens capillary walls within the retina, help with night vision, and can delay the progression of retinitis pigmentosa, a hereditary eye disorder that starts with night blindness and ultimately results in total blindness
  • Carrots – these have always had a reputation as being “good for the eyes”
  • Corn – corn contains the powerful antioxidant zeaxanthin that combats age-related eye disorders
  • Leafy, dark green vegetables such as kale, Swiss chard, collard greens and spinach – great sources of lutein, another eye-protective antioxidant.
  • Omega-3 – from seafood, orange, yellow and dark-green fruits and vegetables may also avert eye disease and deter macular degeneration
  • Kiwis, Grapes, Orange Juice, Mangoes
  • Celery, Yellow and Red Peppers, Okra, Peas, Romaine Lettuce, Broccoli, Avocadoes, Plums, Pumpkin, Brussels Sprouts, yellow and red peppers, broccoli, peas, Romaine lettuce, Brussels sprouts, celery, pumpkin, okra, plums – provide protection from macular degeneration

Prevent Macula Degeneration

Macula degeneration is an eye disease that affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field. Very small, fragile blood vessels begin to leak blood and fluid in the retina causing further damage and the macular degeneration progresses. It is still unknown why parts of the retina become diseased.

It has been shown that a combination of high-dose beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc can reduce the risk of progressing from early to advanced AMD by about 25 percent.

There is pigment in the macula that appears to act as a filter to protect the macular area against oxidation by light. Also this macular pigment can scavenge free radicals. In 2007, a study at the National Eye Institute, Maryland found that Lutein and zeaxanthin protect against macular degeneration. Lutein and zeaxanthin, two yellow colored antioxidants found in leafy greens like spinach and kale, are the predominant pigments in this area.

Eating foods rich in lutein and zeaxanthin can lower your risk of macular degeneration.

To get the benefits of these antioxidants, some researchers believe you need to eat about 6 mg a day. But the amount of lutein and zeaxanthin needed to treat macular degeneration rises to about 11-12 mg per day. Because of the quality of diets these days it is estimated that a person only gets 1-2mg per day.

The best sources of Lutein and Zeaxanthin are:

  • Kale and spinach
  • Turnip and collard greens
  • Romaine lettuce
  • Broccoli
  • Zucchini
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Peas
  • Egg yolk

By far the best source of lutein is in egg yolks. This source is superior because it is more easily absorbed by your body.

Lutein is an oil-soluble nutrient, so in order for the body to absorb it so try adding some fat like olive oil, butter, or coconut oil, to the leafy greens.