Natural Eyesight Improvement Books and Information

There are lots of vision improvement books, courses, audio books, charts, tools, you name it. Before you hand over your hard earned cash you can do a search on google for free information. On Google Books you can view the book that started it all – Better eyesight without glasses by W H Bates (the link will take you to a version that you can read online, for free). The book was a revolution – and a shock to the established ophthalmologists. It is strange however that they are still taught at college and medical school that eyesight cannot be taught naturally. Another great resource full of downloadable e-books and magazines about improving eyesight naturally is http://www.cleareyesight.info.

Vision Chart

How else would you monitor the progress of your natural vision exercises than test them with the Snellen eye chart. There are many sites out there that have printable examples of this chart, but the best one I have come across is from I-See.org. This site has many versions of the chart, and the beauty of the thing is that it is free! The downloads section of the site has a printable PDF version of the chart as well as postscript. Enjoy!

Feel free to post other links and resources that you might find!

The muscles of the eye and how to exercise them

The human eye has six muscles that control its movement in the eye socket. These muscles, like any other muscles, can be toned, too tight, or too loose. With the stresses and strains of modern living most of our muscles are in a state of tension – which directly affect the shape of the eyeball. Eye exercises can tone these muscles. Toned muscles are in a relaxed state of readiness almost. It has been said that the greatest form of tension is lack of usage. Ask anyone who hardly moves how much energy they have. Then look at someone who exercises regularly. These eye muscles then provide information about what exercises will target what muscles. The muscles in the eyes are:

  1. Elevator of the eyelid – raises the upper eyelid
  2. Superior oblique – rolls the eyeball
  3. Superior rectus – turns the front (cornea) upwards
  4. External rectus – turns the front (cornea) outwards
  5. Internal rectus – turns the front (cornea) inwards
  6. Inferior oblique – rolls the eyeball
  7. Inferior rectus – turns the front (cornea) downwards

The primary muscle to affect the shape of the eyeball is the superior oblique muscle (number 2). A simple eye rolling exercise, controlled so it takes 10 seconds or so to perform one rotation done for 1 minute each direction will target this muscle. Practice this everyday along with other muscles. This is a great video which shows how this muscle works.

Vision Correction

Glasses have been around for centuries to help improve and provide clearer vision. More modern methods of vision correction such as contact lenses and eye surgery are more advanced, but actually treat the symptoms rather than the cause, just as glasses do. Even pinhole glasses have been used to focus light rays on the retina.

It is believed that glasses promote further deterioration of the eyes, and prevent natural healing. Glasses put additional strain on the eyes. Natural vision coaches recommend their clients stop wearing, or at least get a reduced prescription, when using natural vision correction methods. Natural vision coaches teach that if the eyes are relaxed and reconditioned, vision will improve. Eye exercises are used to train coordination and flexibility for muscles in and around the eye. They strengthen the muscles and nerves in the brain and vision system to help correct vision.

Relaxed central vision is a key to natural eyesight improvement according to the natural vision coaches, or Bates Method practitioners. However there is some debate whether natural vision correction is valid. For example it is not recognized by the American Optometric Association.

People that practice natural vision correction usually are not licensed professionals however; some licensed professionals may practice natural correction on the side.

The benefits of natural vision correction are that it is a non-invasive, natural, and holistic method that can be used alongside other vision aids such as glasses and contact lenses. There is no risk involved whilst trying natural vision correction methods. The downside is that it can take time to notice any benefits.